Author Topic: Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen  (Read 312 times)

EscapeRacing

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Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen
« on: March 26, 2021, 10:34:42 PM »
Thought I would share my thoughts and pics of using a QuickJack 5000 on my 79 Trans Am.

Overall, I am pleased with the QuickJack, but I do still find myself using jack stands about half the time. This is mostly due to the fact that it takes longer to take out the QuickJack and position it under the frame rails than it does to just grab a floor jack and some stands. If I am going to be doing any kind of work that will have the car in the air for a long time, or if I need to use the jack stands for other parts of the project then the QuickJack comes out.

First, its not cheap. I paid about $1,500 but you can probably find deals on them from time to time.

As far as height, its great. Technically it will hold the car at a variety of heights, but really you should only use two because those have locking points. And its really stable - I give it some good shoves and it doesnt move. I dont really trust any kind of jack stands or the QuickJack entirely so I tend to throw a couple of tires under the car somewhere that will give me an escape route if a worst case scenario happens or at least not die.

The biggest drawbacks to the QuickJack are that it takes up space in the garage (albeit not much), its darn heavy (dont believe the picture of the guy on the box with one under each arm...), take some time to setup for each use, take some time to get used to using, and the biggest drawback is you cannot access the car from the sides - only the front or back. Technically you can position the QuickJack left-right and get under the sides of the car, but then you cannot slide under from the front or back.

The QuickJack is absolutely fantastic for doing oil changes, rear end work, suspension work, gas tank, really anything not directly under the car. It's not ideal for transmission work, exhaust work, or things like that.

I typically put one pad as far forward on the frame rail as I can get and the other just in front of the leaf spring mounts at the back of the car. The two stands need to be parallel to each other for proper function.

Let me know if you have questions.



« Last Edit: March 27, 2021, 10:20:11 AM by EscapeRacing »
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737driver

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Re: Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2021, 01:40:36 AM »
I have the Quick Jacks now for almost 3 years now and I have used them quite a bit. I use them on so many different jobs. To me, they are the poor mans lift. They work well in doing any kind of work where the car has to be lifted.
Jim





1979 Trans Am- Heritage Brown -W72 (Pontiac 400) -4Speed-WS6
1972 LeMans Convertible
1977 Trans Am
1972 Firebird
1971 Firebird
1977 MGB  Roadster Convertible

737driver

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Re: Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2021, 11:45:08 PM »
I can say this, I have used it in just about every phase of restoration. I used mine to raise it up to attach it to a rotisserie.  I also used it remove and install rear axle assemblies, exhaust systems, fuel tank etc. as far as sub frame goes you can lift the body at pinch welds and install subframe. From that point the remainder of the front suspension can be installed as well.
I’ve also used it for any type of service or routine maintenance as well. The only exception I have experienced was when weight on wheels are required. I encountered this on my Lemans when adjusting the rear suspension. I did use them to raise the car high enough to install ramps under each wheel to do that.
One question is “ how stable is it?” , in my opinion it is more stable than floor jacks, by far. Secondly, the quick jacks are safer than trying to put floor jacks under the car. There is really no shifting at all either.
All in all they are quite versatile and I have used mine quite a bit.
Jim
1979 Trans Am- Heritage Brown -W72 (Pontiac 400) -4Speed-WS6
1972 LeMans Convertible
1977 Trans Am
1972 Firebird
1971 Firebird
1977 MGB  Roadster Convertible

EscapeRacing

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Re: Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2021, 03:07:19 PM »
Nice write-up. You can't can't access the car from the side? Can you explain this please. The photos don't appear to be too long, does the assembly sit behind wheels when down? Can it be shuffled from the side to tuck in behind? I can use a regular floor jack under the diff easily, but even my extra low jack won't get under the front with air baffle strip. Car doesn't even have all the front end weight on it yet, imagine TA front spoiler is a similar issue.

Take a look at the pic of the white Trans Am, side view.
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EscapeRacing

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Re: Using a QuickJack on a 2nd Gen
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2021, 01:45:07 PM »
I was referring to the picture in the thread posted by 737driver. It shows how the QuickJack runs along the sides of the car between the front and rear wheels. You can see a similar view in the picture in my original post. You are not able to access the undercarriage by sliding under the driver or passenger door. You can still slide under the car from the front or back. You can also turn the QuickJack 90 degrees and raise the car that way. I have not done that yet so I cannot talk to the stability but you would be able to slide under the car at the doors.
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