Author Topic: Dust Extraction  (Read 179 times)

Ford5of5

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1098
  • I reject your reality and substitute my own
Dust Extraction
« on: August 08, 2019, 06:09:00 PM »
Any contractors/carpenters using portable dust extraction on their job sites? I just built some cabinets and trimmed out a room in oak and ended up feeling crappy for a few days. I was using a shop vac attached to my miter saw but the saw really wasn't made for dust extracting so the results were sort of meh. My circular saw, jig saw and router do not have any dust extraction.

A few years back I spent a month in the hospital with pneumonia. It was a bacterial infection that I caught from my little one. At the time, I had a cold and the little one had strep throat. I did the manly thing and kept working, also did a bunch of welding and grinding to my car. My doctors insist that metal and wood dust weren't the issue, it was the kid!

I guess the big question is what are you using? The dedicated DE vacs are about a $1000 compared $150 for a shop vac and some hoses.

FormTA

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3166
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2019, 08:58:03 PM »
No info on the dust extraction but like you I used to get nasty respiratory issues after, grinding and welding in my shop. I now wear a respirator whenever I can,  even when I am working with wood.  Ya, I look like a weirdo but I can totally tell the difference if I don't.
79 Trans am 301 (work in progress) LS swap n progress
79 Formula 301 (Work in progress)
67 RS Camaro (Work in progress)
See the recurring theme???

roadking77

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9116
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2019, 06:13:27 AM »
We dont normally, but we should. It depends on the job at hand. Lately we have been doing a lot of Hardi siding. That stuff is brutal. We use the crappy particle mask, and hook the shop vac up to the dust port on the table saw. That seems to help a little but not great. If we sand a floor, we use mask's, sander hooks up to the shop vac, and we also put a hose to the outlet and put that out of a window along with fans in the window pulling air out. In my shop I have a dedicated dust collecter (jet unit) hooked  to my table saw. I also have 2 large air filters, one delta, I think the other is a jet. They hang from the ceiling and circulate the air. They do a good job. Depending on what we cut we will use a shop vac to help, example mdf. If its really dusty I will use a particle mask, my son has a better face mask with replacable filters. Ive never had problem with oak, but I dont use it that often. Our area we use more cherry than anything and that stuff has a nasty dust to it. Mahogany is the worst. That dust burns your throat. I always use protection when working with that. I too suffer from lung issues, I get a mild case of pneumonia about once a year, amongst other breathing issues. I have never smoked. I think its from 40 years of construction.
Finished!
77 T/A - I will Call this one DONE!
79 TATA 4sp-Next Project?
79 TATA - Lost to Fire!
86 Grand Prix - Sold
85 T/A - Sold
85 Fiero - Sold
82 Firebird - Sold
'38-CZ 250
'39-BSA Gold Star
'49-Triumph 350
'52-Ariel Red Hunter
'66-BSA Lightning
'01-HD RoadKing

Gene-73

  • Active Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 160
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2019, 12:52:39 PM »
This is kind of related to the OP's question and something I just discovered which works really good so I thought I'd share.

Using an effective dust shroud for a particular tool is most of the battle in controlling dust, then hooking up to a shop vac is the rest of the solution. But I found another cool piece that goes in between those two. It's a cyclonic vacuum accessory that captures the particulate matter before it has a chance to clog up your shop vac filter or bag.

The product I used is called Dust Deputy and it's available here https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002JP315K/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2ZBWTZC55WHJH&psc=1

There are a lot of videos on YouTube demonstrating it's effectiveness. I've been doing a lot of block sanding lately and have been going through a lot of shop vac bags but with this I'm having to change out the consumables a lot less. I highly recommend this.
Gene


Ford5of5

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1098
  • I reject your reality and substitute my own
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2019, 09:29:08 AM »
Gene-73, you hit the nail on the head. Most miter saws and some circular saws have provisions for a vac hookup, usually it's for a dust bag, but lack a shroud or dust chute to capture it. If you want that stuff on your saws you need to buy the more costly saws that a can be 50% more than the non DE versions and quite often loose features. The Gerrys are way ahead on this but I don't wanna deal with Festool prices.

The other issue, I'm into Makita. Makita is absolutely bipolar with their DE setups. They tend to be dedicated to a single tool and you need to buy expensive, non-standardized rubber fittings to get a hose to hook up to their other stuff. It seems that sometimes Makita can be just as expensive as the Festool.

I made a half-ass fume extractor for welding using scrap steel and a dog's cone of shame attached to my shop vac. It worked well enough but the effort was barely worth it considering a cheap box fan can do the same thing. Before I could refine it, either my brother or dad ending up taking it to the scrap yard; neither will admit to throwing it out!  :shock: :lol:

Many of the cyclone devices seem rather delicate and easy to break in the hands of a 200lb gorilla. How well is yours holding up?


Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2019, 09:29:08 AM »

Ford5of5

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1098
  • I reject your reality and substitute my own
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2019, 09:36:59 AM »
@ Roadking, I use a dust mask for cutting mdf and plywood panels or else I end up with a sore throat. I don't use a mask for mdf trim mouldings probably because it's just so much less dust. 

Gene-73

  • Active Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 160
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2019, 12:44:05 PM »
Many of the cyclone devices seem rather delicate and easy to break in the hands of a 200lb gorilla. How well is yours holding up?

I only weigh 180 lbs so not sure if I'm qualified to answer. :)

Mine seems to be made pretty well and the plastic material is sturdy enough. It's sold as a DIY solution so you have to mount it to an enclosed bucket.  With the bucket I used, the whole thing is about 3 feet tall and will easily fall over if you're using it with a hand tool that is moving around.  I could see having issues if it keeps getting knocked over a lot.  I'm currently using it with a sandbag strapped to it to give it some mass, but plan on fastening it more permanently to a wheeled, weighted base so I can pull it around the same way the shop vac is on wheels.

Instructions have you fasten a grounding wire with a weight on the end to it to reduce the static electricity build up (optional), but with full time mobile use that probably wouldn't last long.

Overall, with my occasional use I can see it lasting me a long time so I'm happy with it.
Gene


roadking77

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9116
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2019, 08:00:55 AM »
MDF is pretty good for many things, but it def. is brutal to cut. Seems like it takes forever to get all of the dust out of the shop after cutting. I had a really nice porter cable r/o sander (bought it when they first came out). It had an accessory dust hood that hooked up to a vac. Worked pretty good but the pad eventually dryrotted. Tool is still perfect but the replacement pad cost more than a new sander!
Finished!
77 T/A - I will Call this one DONE!
79 TATA 4sp-Next Project?
79 TATA - Lost to Fire!
86 Grand Prix - Sold
85 T/A - Sold
85 Fiero - Sold
82 Firebird - Sold
'38-CZ 250
'39-BSA Gold Star
'49-Triumph 350
'52-Ariel Red Hunter
'66-BSA Lightning
'01-HD RoadKing

JBG

  • Active Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 329
      • http://www.jbguitars.com
Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2019, 09:20:23 AM »
These masks look interesting:  https://www.rzmask.com

It's on my list of things to get/try.  I despise the "traditional" dust masks when working in the shop. 

Shop dust:  I built an air scrubber fan/filter for my shop that I use in conjunction with my dust collection system.  It's basically a squirrel-cage fan mounted in an enclosure, with a frame to hold a furnace filter.  It's mounted on an old toolbox bottom with casters so I can move it around to whatever machine I'm using.  It's a nice way to catch a lot of the airborne dust that doesn't make it into the collector... especially for mdf.  That stuff is like powder.  I also have a spring-loaded timer so I can set it and leave the shop & it will scrub/filter the air until it shuts off on its own.  If you install a carbon filter it'll get rid of shop stink, too.  You can also take a regular box-fan from Walmart (or whatever store you've got), and duct-tape a 20"x20" filter to the inflow side & use that in a pinch.  I've done that in my basement when I accidentally dropped a shop vac & it opened up.  Poof! 

Portable:  most chop-saws have a dust port.  A shop vac is probably still the best option in the field.  Make sure the internal filter is clean or not packed with dust.  I had to fab a bushing/connector to fit the end of my Delta 10" miter saw to a 2" vacuum hose, as the housing was slightly undersized. 
THREADKILLER
75 T/A

Re: Dust Extraction
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2019, 09:20:23 AM »
You can help support TAC!