Author Topic: Importing my TA into Australia  (Read 595 times)

DeVilliers

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Importing my TA into Australia
« on: April 09, 2019, 01:05:51 AM »
Morning all,

I'm hoping some Australian members can be of assistance.

Me and my family are looking at immigrating from South Africa to Australia. Anybody following the situation in South Africa will probably understand why. I need to look out for my 5 year old son's future. Anyway, let's not go into details...........

This move will not happen overnight, but it does seem likely in the next year or so.

I've spent way to much money on restoring the Trans Am already to just sell it. I'm in for about Aus $35000 already and counting.
If at all possible, I would like to bring the car over with me, and this is where I require some assistance. Yes, I know it will probably be ridiculously expensive.

I've looked at Dept. of Infrastructure and Dept. of Agriculture websites. It does seem there may be a way I can get the car imported. It is however a bit confusing and I hope some of the Australia members here can help to clarify.
I'd like to plan for this while doing the restoration, if at all possible.

It looks like the car is not on an SEVS register or is it? Then even if it is, it looks like the car must be 100% original, which mine is not, because it's got a different engine.
I've not contacted any RAW agents to see if they can help.
According to DOI there is a personal import option if I have owned the vehicle for longer than 12 months. What I'm not sure about is the originality of the vehicle. Does it need to be 100% original?
The way I understand is that I can get the car over on an import permit but that it may not be legal on the road until State requirements are met? I'm not sure what these will be in terms of passing and roadworthy inspection.

I guess I just need to be sure it's possible. I don't want to ship the car only to be refused entry and destroyed or returned. Any assistance or advise will be appreciated.

Thanks
1979 Trans Am

aussieta

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 01:57:31 AM »
as your car is over 30 years old there are very few issues bringing your car into australia
you will need a freight company to handle it, you can leave it left hand drive as well
once here you will need a road worthy certificate, basically check tyres lights brakes etc to confirm it is safe
proof of ownership, approval to import certificate
you may need to pay import duties, i am unsure as it is a private vehicle not a business import
check vicroads etc for state rules https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/registration/new-registration/register-an-imported-vehicle
varies slightly by state
most rego branches would not know what is an original engine and what is not, unless you had a 671 supercharger hanging out your bonnet
1978 Y84 W72 WS6
A Camaro looks like it could kick your ass.
A Trans Am looks like it's coming over to do it

Aus78Formula

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2019, 03:35:17 AM »
In NSW, at least, every Firebird for certain years is listed officially on their records as a TA. Makes mine rarer! If it looks original and not out of place they are happy with it.

I haven't had to import an entire car but it's done all the time, there's been so many LHD cars arrive here in recent years, and just as many listed for sale on sites ready to be loaded once they have a buyer. That's from the US, though. Other than the usual checks and clearance for quarantine and any extra taxes or fees it should be ok to be released here, then look at what is required to get it roadworthy with or without mods. But I don't know the specifics or where to find them for S.A. to Aus.

aussieta

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2019, 03:43:04 AM »
aus78
my ta is the rarest
when i registered it in australia it was 17 years old. 1978 model
in victoria cars under 15 years old must be converted to rhd and a compliance plate fitted
i did not need a compliance plate, but computer could not register car without the compliance plate number
to get around it my car is registered as a 1900 trans am
1978 Y84 W72 WS6
A Camaro looks like it could kick your ass.
A Trans Am looks like it's coming over to do it

Aus78Formula

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2019, 03:49:46 AM »
very classic then, good shape for its age!

Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2019, 03:49:46 AM »

Jack

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2019, 05:14:30 AM »
Talk to Luckyphil he is on here although I have not seen him post much lately.




Regards, Jack

Maxthe222

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2019, 06:12:06 AM »
Well... here we go.

Do not attempt to ship the car over without getting an import approval. That's how the car gets refused entry, but what normally happens is, the car has to wait in a quarantine or holding bay for as long as it takes to get an import approval, and they charge you per day for that, and it's normally big bananas. It's only $50 for an approval, so it's no big deal. It generally takes two weeks to get approved, and I have gotten approvals for T/A's that are total wrecks, i.e rusted to the core with no floors.

Since you have owned the car for 12 months, and are looking to get a citizenship, you can apply to get the car here and pay no tax under the personal import option. (Just tell 'em the car has been roadworthy for more than 12 months just incase it hasn't been). Your biggest cost will be paying tax, I can assure you that. If you want an exact figure on how much it would cost to bring over, I would say, $5,000. Just as long as you don't use any crooks, some companies I would avoid are someone called "Troy" or something, I've heard bad things about them, and Shermatt. Shermatt did my Y84, and there's a reason why I won't use him again. It's normally ~$2,500 for the container and the actual shipping, $2,500 for dock and cleaning/quarantine charges yada yada yada. If quarantine inspects your car again and find it is still dirty, they will charge you to clean it again. And again. And again. If they charge you too many times for cleaning, just pay the bill, get the car, and sue later. You don't wanna have the car be sent to a storage lot and constantly accrue storage fees.

Next problem:
Asbestos. You car is a TH350 yeah? If you've got drum brakes, I'd remove the pads. Now I know for a fact that quarantine does not check every car for asbestos, but they check 1 in 50. IF they do decided to check your car, it's generally random, but reasons why they'd check your car is if it has drum brakes or a manual transmission. Asbestos was found in clutches and drum brakes, which is why they pick on those cars. All my cars were 4 wheel disc, but some companies removed the disc brakes to be safe anyway. They will charge you up the hoo-hah if you get caught with asbestos in your car.

Ok, so your car made it into Australia with out making you homeless. Now let's start driving it around here. Now ya got two options. Be a sucker and get a normal car registration, or get Historical Registration. A normal car registration means the car can be driven everyday with no problem or limitations. That costs a grand a year. Orrrrrrr, ya get the historical rego. $80 for the first year, and $40 every following year. When you get this, you can only drive your car 60 times a year, and to club events or a mechanics on-top. You have to write down every day you drive into a lil' piece of paper that not a single soul besides yourself will ever be bothered to look at unless you run into a jealous police officer. But, when you have historic registration, your insurance is immediately cheaper, half the cost of normal insurance or even lower. Full comprehensive fire, theft, tornado, etc. (Also, no one checks the log book so just drive it as much as you want). To get either-or rego, you need to take your car to a qualified mechanic/vehicle inspection guy who checks your car out to make sure it's safe to drive on aussie roads. Now technically, your vehicle needs to comply with the safety standards from the year it was made, so i.e. Australian vehicle safety requirements for 1979. Also further more-so technically, you need to have orange indicator lights, but those are for people who aren't afraid to modify their car, so if you have an ultra pristine original to the spark plugs Y82, you don't need to change the tail-lights because again, very few police (or people in general) are aware that they need to be changed. Even if, they aren't gunna defect notice (say your car is not safe for the road) your car if you're on historical rego because the vehicle needs to be 100% original to get historical rego.

Oh, the 100% original thing. Ok so most people down here are philistines and have thrown out their glorious 400 Pontiac's and venerable Oldsmobile 403's and put rubbish engines into their T/A's like 350 chevs and stuff like that. They can drive their cars around with no problem every day on NORMAL rego ( :?). But on the cooler rego  8) (Historical) you must have the "original" engine. In reality, it doesn't need to be the exact numbers matching engine, it can be the exact same block. Actually, I just checked with the boss, you can get historical rego as long as the engine is somewhat sorta relatively period correct to the car. Example: Olds 350, Yes. Pontiac 400, Yes. LS1 Big fat no. Some historic clubs (You have to pretend to be in a club to get historic rego or heaven forbid actually join the club) will turn you away for not having the correct AC Delco battery leads on your engine, some clubs will give you rego without even asking what engine is in it. 

Same goes for the interior, if the car looks roughly the same as it did from factory, you'll get it no problem. No down here (bar a few) will be able to tell what's original and what's not down here. This brings me to another point. Take your T/A to the right workshop to get your rego, don't take it to a modern mechanic who will pick on your car, say this and that it isn't roadworthy because it's a 40 year old car and give you a hard time, there's plenty of shops who'll respect the car and give you rego no problem (granted the car is in semi-decent condition). Some places will even give you paperwork to get historical regos (I myself, would definitely not know any such places like that or anything, like no way at all, nuh-uh) for a car that's been super heavily modified and upgraded, but the problem is, if you get pulled over by the rozzers, and they say pop the bonnet, bye bye birdie (or licence) {Or rego for that car again}. The guys who gave you the rego will probably just say you did those mods after you got the car rego'd, anyway you can fill in the blanks.

So, TL:DR?
It's not horribly expensive
Say you've been driving the car for more than 12 months
The car can be Frankenstein's firebird to bring into the country, as long as the VIN is good and you have a "title"
You can get historical rego if the car looks like it's original and you sorta have the same engine, regular rego do whatever
You can get roadworthy cert if the car, y'know, is roadworthy (i.e brakes, steers, has an indicator, has seatbelts etc.)


Oh and don't use roll-on/roll-off to bring the car in. Ask lucky phil why they call him lucky phil, and ask to see what's left of that once beautiful TATA he had.

1979 T/A Y84 WS6
1979 F/A W72 WS6
1971 Formula 400 4-Speed

DeVilliers

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2019, 06:20:15 AM »
Thanks for all the responses. It looks promising.

I will definitely make use of a freight company.

From what I can see, roadworthy rules are more or less the same that side. I'm just not sure about emissions control. But that's not really an issue for me because I can get it sorted that side if it does not pass roadworthy.
Most important thing is that the car will be allowed into the country.

Thanks. I have "spoken" to Phil before, right when I joined. Will see if he perhaps responds here.
1979 Trans Am

DeVilliers

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2019, 06:25:06 AM »
Thanks for the reply. some good info here. Thanks

Well... here we go.

Do not attempt to ship the car over without getting an import approval. That's how the car gets refused entry, but what normally happens is, the car has to wait in a quarantine or holding bay for as long as it takes to get an import approval, and they charge you per day for that, and it's normally big bananas. It's only $50 for an approval, so it's no big deal. It generally takes two weeks to get approved, and I have gotten approvals for T/A's that are total wrecks, i.e rusted to the core with no floors.

Since you have owned the car for 12 months, and are looking to get a citizenship, you can apply to get the car here and pay no tax under the personal import option. (Just tell 'em the car has been roadworthy for more than 12 months just incase it hasn't been). Your biggest cost will be paying tax, I can assure you that. If you want an exact figure on how much it would cost to bring over, I would say, $5,000. Just as long as you don't use any crooks, some companies I would avoid are someone called "Troy" or something, I've heard bad things about them, and Shermatt. Shermatt did my Y84, and there's a reason why I won't use him again. It's normally ~$2,500 for the container and the actual shipping, $2,500 for dock and cleaning/quarantine charges yada yada yada. If quarantine inspects your car again and find it is still dirty, they will charge you to clean it again. And again. And again. If they charge you too many times for cleaning, just pay the bill, get the car, and sue later. You don't wanna have the car be sent to a storage lot and constantly accrue storage fees.

Next problem:
Asbestos. You car is a TH350 yeah? If you've got drum brakes, I'd remove the pads. Now I know for a fact that quarantine does not check every car for asbestos, but they check 1 in 50. IF they do decided to check your car, it's generally random, but reasons why they'd check your car is if it has drum brakes or a manual transmission. Asbestos was found in clutches and drum brakes, which is why they pick on those cars. All my cars were 4 wheel disc, but some companies removed the disc brakes to be safe anyway. They will charge you up the hoo-hah if you get caught with asbestos in your car.

Ok, so your car made it into Australia with out making you homeless. Now let's start driving it around here. Now ya got two options. Be a sucker and get a normal car registration, or get Historical Registration. A normal car registration means the car can be driven everyday with no problem or limitations. That costs a grand a year. Orrrrrrr, ya get the historical rego. $80 for the first year, and $40 every following year. When you get this, you can only drive your car 60 times a year, and to club events or a mechanics on-top. You have to write down every day you drive into a lil' piece of paper that not a single soul besides yourself will ever be bothered to look at unless you run into a jealous police officer. But, when you have historic registration, your insurance is immediately cheaper, half the cost of normal insurance or even lower. Full comprehensive fire, theft, tornado, etc. (Also, no one checks the log book so just drive it as much as you want). To get either-or rego, you need to take your car to a qualified mechanic/vehicle inspection guy who checks your car out to make sure it's safe to drive on aussie roads. Now technically, your vehicle needs to comply with the safety standards from the year it was made, so i.e. Australian vehicle safety requirements for 1979. Also further more-so technically, you need to have orange indicator lights, but those are for people who aren't afraid to modify their car, so if you have an ultra pristine original to the spark plugs Y82, you don't need to change the tail-lights because again, very few police (or people in general) are aware that they need to be changed. Even if, they aren't gunna defect notice (say your car is not safe for the road) your car if you're on historical rego because the vehicle needs to be 100% original to get historical rego.

Oh, the 100% original thing. Ok so most people down here are philistines and have thrown out their glorious 400 Pontiac's and venerable Oldsmobile 403's and put rubbish engines into their T/A's like 350 chevs and stuff like that. They can drive their cars around with no problem every day on NORMAL rego ( :?). But on the cooler rego  8) (Historical) you must have the "original" engine. In reality, it doesn't need to be the exact numbers matching engine, it can be the exact same block. Actually, I just checked with the boss, you can get historical rego as long as the engine is somewhat sorta relatively period correct to the car. Example: Olds 350, Yes. Pontiac 400, Yes. LS1 Big fat no. Some historic clubs (You have to pretend to be in a club to get historic rego or heaven forbid actually join the club) will turn you away for not having the correct AC Delco battery leads on your engine, some clubs will give you rego without even asking what engine is in it. 

Same goes for the interior, if the car looks roughly the same as it did from factory, you'll get it no problem. No down here (bar a few) will be able to tell what's original and what's not down here. This brings me to another point. Take your T/A to the right workshop to get your rego, don't take it to a modern mechanic who will pick on your car, say this and that it isn't roadworthy because it's a 40 year old car and give you a hard time, there's plenty of shops who'll respect the car and give you rego no problem (granted the car is in semi-decent condition). Some places will even give you paperwork to get historical regos (I myself, would definitely not know any such places like that or anything, like no way at all, nuh-uh) for a car that's been super heavily modified and upgraded, but the problem is, if you get pulled over by the rozzers, and they say pop the bonnet, bye bye birdie (or licence) {Or rego for that car again}. The guys who gave you the rego will probably just say you did those mods after you got the car rego'd, anyway you can fill in the blanks.

So, TL:DR?
It's not horribly expensive
Say you've been driving the car for more than 12 months
The car can be Frankenstein's firebird to bring into the country, as long as the VIN is good and you have a "title"
You can get historical rego if the car looks like it's original and you sorta have the same engine, regular rego do whatever
You can get roadworthy cert if the car, y'know, is roadworthy (i.e brakes, steers, has an indicator, has seatbelts etc.)


Oh and don't use roll-on/roll-off to bring the car in. Ask lucky phil why they call him lucky phil, and ask to see what's left of that once beautiful TATA he had.
1979 Trans Am

DeVilliers

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2019, 06:38:20 AM »
Yes, the car has a TH350.
Rear pads I can understand. What about front? This has me concerned on how the car is moved around. or how does in work?

Well mine has one of those rubbish 350 chev engines :) and that will probably not change, so original is out the window for me.
1979 Trans Am

Casey

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2019, 02:42:49 PM »
The Chevrolet 305/350 were factory options, just not for the Trans Am.  Well, outside of the '80-81 305 4-speed Trans Am anyway.

Maxthe222

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2019, 05:00:03 PM »
Well it's good it's an TH350, because there shouldn't be any clutch pads or signs of asbestos. As for the brakes, I'm not 100%, they might just give you the brake pads when the car arrives again. When my Y84 arrived, they didn't take the pads off, the freight guy saw they were very new pads and didn't bother taking them off. I drove the car home from the freight yard. But with the FIRE AM, they took all the brake pads off because they looked heaps dodgy and they were more than 20-30 years old. But that car did not have any drum brakes. If they look like even slightly old pads, they might pull you for asbestos cleaning, again, it's a 1 in 50 thing, so chances are it won't happen. Also, the freight company and yard should never, ever start your car. They should never drive it. So moving it around isn't a problem. It's also good it's an automatic, because fortunately they can just put it in park. If they need to roll the car around, they will put it into neutral and roll it around by hand. Make sure they know to put the key in the barrel to unlock the transmission, not everyone knows how to use old cars. If your front are disc, then it should be ok. It depends on the freight company, some freight companies won't look at your car if it doesn't have a full tank of gas, some companies don't even care if you don't have a title.

With the engine, it's really about how dodgy the guy who gives you rego is, and if a cop who knows how to read a firebird VIN pulls you over, but again, I get pulled over all the time for being a p-plater (the licence you get as a teenager before you get a full licence) driving a big fat V8, and they have to radio base 15 times to check what a Oldsmobile 403 is and if a p-plater can drive one. I looked into the normal rego thing, I think you must have either a correct service replacement engine (or just number job an similar engine) or you have to get something called Conditional Registration, as your car may be classified as modified.

No one cares about emissions here on old cars, if your car isn't blowing black smoke constantly, it's fine. All you need to do is fill out the $50 import approval, and if that form comes back as approved, there is nothing to worry about, the car is allowed in no problem. After that it's a matter of how much you will be billed for cleaning for asbestos or whatever. There is no reason after they approve your import form that they can send back the car. (unless it comes back stolen or something but even then, they should check that when they do the form, annnnddd they don't care if it is because what are they gunna do about it lol).

Oh and you could import the car yourself and save a few gorillas, but if you're not confident there are several import companies you can use with lots of experience.
1979 T/A Y84 WS6
1979 F/A W72 WS6
1971 Formula 400 4-Speed

aussieta

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2019, 11:53:11 PM »
i dont think asbestos has been used in the aut industry for a very long time
so unless you have your original brake pads you should be fine
never heard of a car even being checked for asbestos so may be an urban legend thing or state by state
1978 Y84 W72 WS6
A Camaro looks like it could kick your ass.
A Trans Am looks like it's coming over to do it

DeVilliers

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2019, 12:43:44 AM »
Max, thanks again for the great info.

On the import permit, yip, that's the first thing I read. No messing around with that. I don't want to find myself in trouble. Do you know if I would need to get police clearance for the vehicle from the current registered country?
I think I will just get it anyway as additional proof that it's not stolen or something.

Regarding the brakes. Front pads are brand new imports from the US, so I doubt those will be a problem. The rear drum shoes have been re-bonded or re-shoed (whatever you call it). Perhaps I can check with the company that did it to confirm if the asbestos in the product of not. Perhaps get is confirmation letter to that effect. Maybe it will help.

The interior will be close to original, but not entirely. New seats, headliner and gauges are the biggest changes.

As I said, we're currently looking at immigration, but we've only started so it still early days and a lot needs to happen. It's actually very sad and daunting, but.............

Anyway, I'll definitely come back to this topic as things progress.
Right now the car is still stuck in paint jail  :mad:, so first it need to get put back together and finish the restoration. 
1979 Trans Am

Maxthe222

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2019, 06:33:54 AM »
Police clearance isn't necessary I don't think, I haven't even heard of people going that far. Generally as long as you just have proof of ownership (A napkin saying you own the car written in tomato sauce counts)

The thing is, people there are dumb and won't know the difference, they just understand that drum = bad, manual = bad so speak with your freight forwarder first.

"Mostly original interior" mostly means "Did you staple cardboard onto the doors and paint it black" if it's past that it's fine.

All good, whenever you need any more info just ask. Hope my F/A doesn't meet the same fate!
1979 T/A Y84 WS6
1979 F/A W72 WS6
1971 Formula 400 4-Speed

Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2019, 06:33:54 AM »



Casey

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2019, 03:48:13 PM »
i dont think asbestos has been used in the aut industry for a very long time
so unless you have your original brake pads you should be fine
never heard of a car even being checked for asbestos so may be an urban legend thing or state by state
There's a car channel on YouTube that're in Australia and they were importing a 240Z and they went over the asbestos thing, so I guess it has to do with the age of the car and if it was known to have used asbestos.  They left the brakes and even the engine and transmission in Japan to get later after being disassembled and cleaned for fear of being caught with asbestos, perhaps overcautious but understandable from what's said would happen anyway.  Something later made that wasn't known to have used it they probably don't bother with, but who knows as it sounds hit or miss rather they care to check or not anyway.

Maxthe222

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2019, 07:52:19 PM »
To completely clarify on the asbestos thing:

If there is any reason why a car would have asbestos, they will pull it aside to check it. It does not matter when the car was made, they will check it regardless. The common reasons for checking a car are for drum brake pads, clutch pads, gaskets in engines, as well as some other parts.

If they do pull your car to check it, they will charge you. It is not cheap. If they legitimately find asbestos, they may fine you further.

HOWEVER, this being said;
Quarantine cannot physically check every car and container for articles containing asbestos. They simply do not have the manpower, facilities, and equipment to do it. Some companies who import dozens of shipments a month have never even had one item or container checked for asbestos cleaning/inspection. It is generally random chance if you car is picked, but if you don't give them any reason to assume your car has asbestos, they will very likely not pull it over. It is generally seen as a 1 in 50 chance of your car being pulled over.

A prime example is a company who shipped over a bulk lot of 2017 Polaris ATV Quad bike thingies. I spoke to the freight company's owner about it when he heard I was bringing over my Y84. They were modern quad bikes bought new. Every single one was pulled as they were identified as being manufactured with asbestos components. They were discovered, pulled, and many were sent back. They were fined and had to pay several fees. This is the only major incident (actually, the only incident I know of) where this happened. Also, there was a large song and dance the media made about the situation, which raised a lot of attention and brought it to the attention of the quarantine department, so that's probably the only reason why they did anything about it.

In short, you simply do not want to give them any reason to pull your car off the lot to inspect it. If they see a car has no brake pads or clutch or anything, they will likely prioritize another vehicle that is very old with all drum brakes on it and a old manual transmission. They have no reason to assume it has any contents containing hazardous material and will likely leave it alone.
1979 T/A Y84 WS6
1979 F/A W72 WS6
1971 Formula 400 4-Speed

DeVilliers

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #17 on: April 11, 2019, 01:13:46 AM »
Ok, two silly questions.

Say I remove the rear shoes. Do I just put the wheel back without the drum to show it is empty? then put the drums in the boot. I've not checked if it's even possible.
How else will they know? They cannot see through the drum.

What about fluids? I saw you mentioned gas. So I assume it must be empty (or as close to empty as you can get it) What about engine oil and trans fluid? Do these need to be drained?
1979 Trans Am

Maxthe222

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Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2019, 03:56:11 AM »
Fluids is no problem at all. My Y84 came fully prepped to drive, the guy who sold it to me gave it a full service, new oil, brake fluid, gas, everything topped up to the brim. Didn't cause any issues at all.

Infact, you'd have no idea if your pads have asbestos or not. They are still sold in some places in the states, so for all you know, you could have asbestos pads. I suppose you could put them in the back of the car, but I have a feeling if they find them, they will just dispose of them. That's where the fees come in, they will disassemble the brake assembly to remove the pads, and they charge you for that time. The reason why I say they don't have the man power or technology to inspect every single container that is imported, is because they will deadset take samples from the brake dust or pads, send them to a lab, test them, and if they came back positive for traces of asbestos, ya better have the cash to get it out of there. That's why it costs so much, and that's why I say it's a 1 in 50 thing. If you don't believe me feel free to check the government department of infrastructure website.

But look, worse comes to worse, they take the pads out of the car and throw them. I personally don't think it will happen to you, there are much worse cars that get imported. And if they do take your pads that were in the boot, have a brand new set in a box with a receipt indicating they were manufactured recently (even thought they might not care as they still might see them as possibly having asbestos), have a set of tools in the car and put the shoes back on when you pick the car up. Honestly, they might not even check the boot. Some companies completely empty the car and put all the contents out on a pallet when you pick the car up. Put it this way, there was a live spider and several webs in my spare tyre when I got that out, so i'm inclined to believe quarantine doesn't touch that stuff.
1979 T/A Y84 WS6
1979 F/A W72 WS6
1971 Formula 400 4-Speed

Re: Importing my TA into Australia
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2019, 03:56:11 AM »
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