Author Topic: Yearone's 18inch Snowflake Rim Nightmare  (Read 999 times)

Aus78Formula

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8477
Re: Yearone's 18inch Snowflake Rim Nightmare
« Reply #40 on: November 06, 2018, 06:25:19 PM »
I'm still not sure who's responsible for the bent rim etc, many are getting named when they probably had little to do with the actual issues.

79T/Aman

  • Oracle Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2488
      • http://www.pro-touringf-body.com
Re: Yearone's 18inch Snowflake Rim Nightmare
« Reply #41 on: November 07, 2018, 07:55:27 AM »
What is "aircraft aluminum" ?

I'll take a guess and say those rims are made from something cheap like 1100 alloy instead of something a little more beefier. Yes, the term 'aircraft aluminum' does get abused a lot. In my case I'm referring to one of the heat treatable structural alloys like 5052 or 7075.

Why guess? or take stabs in the dark? this is turning into something like putting on a lab coat and walking into a hospital and guessing on patient's ills...just to try and be "thee one" that guessed the correct answer.
6061 would be the most common alloy used.
I'm done with the side track debate, this whole fiasco could have been avoided, with a little work with a rag.
www.pro-touringf-body.com  your source for making your Trans am do what it does best!......SHOW OFF!

evob

  • Active Forum Member
  • *
  • Posts: 78
Re: Yearone's 18inch Snowflake Rim Nightmare
« Reply #42 on: November 07, 2018, 04:52:58 PM »
Evob, from what I see.

Those wheels are not 100% cast wheels, the center is cast, the rim is spun aluminum, that is why it's welded in, are they chromed or polished? I bet they are just polished otherwise a marker would not etch the surface .

What was referred to as porosity looks more like compound smears, these things are machine polished with a lot of pressure and can build enough heat to inbed the compound in the aluminum, I agree it should have been cleaned better, but I guaranty the .50/h Chinese worker is not looking at the wheels as close as someone that just spent over 2K (just reality of not paying that much per wheel)again not defending YO.
Using a marker could chemical etch the surface that will not come out, I have some regular markers at the shop that can etch aluminum even after cleaning it off with solvent it is in the aluminum.

FYI if the rim is chromed forget trying to clean them up and powder coating them afterwards, the chemical process from chroming is in the base metal and you can't get it out.

My suggestion is  to always understand what is looked at and do a little research on what the perception is, it may not be what you think.
When I first read this post about YO/US wheel willing to re-work the wheels to take care of porosity sent some giant red flags up for me because porosity can't be fixed and if they co have a way to fill it and polish it to where it is permanent and not leave any ghost markings it would cost more than the wheel is worth.

This leads me to believe they knew that it was just a simple cleaning issue and tried to satisfy a customer.

The bent rim, well that would take some force to do and can't imagine no one noticing but lets face it a minimum wage worker with buds in their ears, mind on something else may just not have noticed.

My advice is go ahead and get another set, research cleaning polished wheels , there simply was no porosity in those rims.

79T I believe that the marks were porosity because when running your finger/pen/pencil/ or other pointed object, across the surface you could feel your finger nail fall into a crack. I knew that they were not compound smears because when the wheels arrived they were covered in polishing compound. After spraying the wheels down with detailing spray and wiping them down the marks were still there. No amount of rubbing would remove the marks.
I agree that when they said that they wanted to "Rework" the porosity marks, it threw red flags for me too. But I figured if they were willing to try and take care of the issue, then it was worth a shot.
The wheels have been sent back to YO/US Wheels for a refund. Personally, I am going to find some other wheel; no idea what yet, that doesn't come from US Wheel. I am in by no means saying that YO was at fault for the manufacturing of the wheel, or the bent wheel. I blame US Wheel for those. I blame YO for not pushing back on US Wheel for a better quality of product for the money. And when it came time to deal with the issue at hand, they simply did not care, and seemed to act like the problem wasn't real. That was where YO went wrong.

I'm just trying to help and inform, I don't know it all but.

"To add injury to insult, as I was looking over the rim, I could still see circles in the chrome from when I lightly scratched the rims with a marker circling the porosity marks (if that makes sense). This tells me that they really didn't do any kind of "rework" at all. More than likely Yearone or US Wheels just sent them to a polisher and told them to only hit a couple of areas. Which didn't work."

from this statement what you call porosity was taken care of,right? but you could see the circles left by the marker.
Again trying to help but you didn't read what I said.
1 The marker can etch aluminum.
2 I explained that heavy load on the polisher can inbed compound, and yes you will feel it with your nail but obviously they were able to remove it without re-polishing the wheel, polishing involves abrasive compounds that would have cut deeper than the etching.
3 the rim is made of spun aluminum NOT cast therefor there can't be any porosity.
4 porosity is caused by air bubbles in a casting, the rim is NOT cast as evident by the ridges from the spin forming.

Unfortunately the "reps" at YO are nothing more than store employees they have rules to follow and have no knowledge or experience in the field of casting, US Wheel probably told YO just send them to us and we will look at the problem and in all honesty there was no problem other than smeared over heated polishing compound, the circles were due to using a permanent marker used.

1. The etching that was caused from the marker was to help me see if US wheel actually did any kind of rework on the wheels. This way the etching would be deep enough to see if their "rework" process would do what it needed to do.
2. While US Wheel seems to have polished the wheels even more, polishing the wheels again did not remove the marks that were already there. It simply made them shinier. Like I said in one of my previous posts, I wiped down the wheels, and tried to wipe the marks away, but no amount of wiping would get rid of them. I tried scratching at them with my fingernail, no compound came out of the marks or on my fingernail.
3 & 4. I am aware they are not cast. I am aware of the process that the aluminum goes through in order to form it into a rim. Just because this is spun aluminum does NOT mean that it is impossible for them to have porosity. It does NOT matter if the metal if cast, a sheet, or extruded, IT CAN STILL HAVE POROSITY. It does not matter what process the metal goes through to form it to the final shape, you need to look before the outer ring was formed. The outer ring would have started out as an aluminum sheet that was rolled to a cylinder. That aluminum sheet would have started life as molten metal at some point, which would have been molded into a big piece of aluminum that would be flatted into aluminum sheets. The foundries process will determine how much porosity will be in the metal. The better the process the better the metal/aluminum. Being the fake that these are made in China, the aluminum probably comes from China, which means it can be very impure, so it is possible for it to have more porosity then normal.

What is "aircraft aluminum" ?

I'll take a guess and say those rims are made from something cheap like 1100 alloy instead of something a little more beefier. Yes, the term 'aircraft aluminum' does get abused a lot. In my case I'm referring to one of the heat treatable structural alloys like 5052 or 7075.

Why guess? or take stabs in the dark? this is turning into something like putting on a lab coat and walking into a hospital and guessing on patient's ills...just to try and be "thee one" that guessed the correct answer.
6061 would be the most common alloy used.
I'm done with the side track debate, this whole fiasco could have been avoided, with a little work with a rag.

Simply wiping down the wheel would not have gotten rid of the marks. Like I said in my first post, and my follow up post, I wiped the wheels down. No amount of "little work" would remove the marks in the wheels.

Re: Yearone's 18inch Snowflake Rim Nightmare
« Reply #42 on: November 07, 2018, 04:52:58 PM »
You can help support TAC!