2020-B4-1

Author Topic: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher  (Read 98313 times)

FormTA

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #840 on: April 04, 2020, 08:33:50 AM »
Thanks for the headliner write up. I'm going to need that when I get back to working on my 67.

I love wiring and soldering.  That has to be my favorite part! Nice little fuse box. I went the hard way and used the under hood fuse box from the 98 as it had relays and rewired it work for me. Since you don't need those this will make a clean install.
79 Trans am 301 (work in progress) LS swap n progress
79 Formula 301 (Work in progress)
67 RS Camaro (Work in progress)
See the recurring theme???

Names, Luke. If I hear anyone telling me they're my father....

TATurbo

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #841 on: April 04, 2020, 09:55:43 PM »
I've been looking for a 2" grommet for my Firewall I also got tired of searching.   Where'd you find yours?
The headliner looks great and I really like the fuse block panel set up and ECU mount.  Looking good!  I hope you get to get out on the road soon. 
Are there some decent driving roads up around your corner of NY?
Tom
King of Prussia, PA

1981 Turbo Trans-Am
Build thread - http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=69897.0

roadking77

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #842 on: April 05, 2020, 09:03:29 AM »
As a casual observer, not to speak for Ryan, but last spring my wife and I took a trip to his neck of the woods. IMO there are plenty of decent drives to be had. Honestly I would have preferred to have had my m/c on the trip, but a convertible was almost as fun. Very pretty country side, hilly but not mountainous (and to my surprise lots of Amish, it was almost like being at home).
Finished!
77 T/A - I will Call this one DONE!
79 TATA 4sp-Next Project?
79 TATA - Lost to Fire!
86 Grand Prix - Sold
85 T/A - Sold
85 Fiero - Sold
82 Firebird - Sold
'38-CZ 250
'39-BSA Gold Star
'49-Triumph 350
'52-Ariel Red Hunter
'66-BSA Lightning
'01-HD RoadKing

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #843 on: April 13, 2020, 08:31:34 AM »
I've been plugging away working towards a complete interior and other misc. things here and there. I finished up the install of the fuse and relay blocks as well as the mounting of the ECU. I love the placement of everything, but it was difficult to find a mounting location that was easy to get to, but also retaining the glove box. So I opted to use the glove box for my wiring needs.







It's Alive!! Once all the wiring is final, I'll tidy everything up with some loom.





I've been constantly impressed with the condition of the original parts on this car. Here are the original windlace trim parts from the car. I was assuming that I'd need to replace these with new, but thought I might try cleaning them up. I'm glad I did, they are in great shape and are still quite flexible! I'll let you guess which was was the before.



Since the Terminator X has a universal LS wiring harness, I needed to add in the t56 "sub" harness for the Reverse lights, Reverse lockout and Vehicle Speed. I picked up one of the pigtail kits for the three connectors from eBay and VSS and RLO were perfect, but the reverse light switch had female terminals installed rather than the correct male. It took me about an hour to figure that out. So I've ordered a new set of correct terminals and a Metri-pack terminal removal tool. Should be here by the end of the week to finish that up. I should mention that only the VSS and Reverse Lockout will be hooked up to the ECU. The Reverse lights do not communicate with the ECU at all, but rather are wired into the body harness.



Picture's blurry, but that's the best I could do to show that the reverse switch has the female terminals on it, so the plug would need male terminals to install correctly.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2020, 09:19:11 AM by ryeguy2006a »

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #844 on: April 13, 2020, 09:11:49 AM »
Moving back to the headliner install, I was able to get back in and stretch it all nice and tight. One thing that was bugging me was in the center of the headliner where the bows attach to the center of the roof was a noticeable spot that was being pulled up. When I installed the bows, I put all of them in the lowest of three holes. Looking back I should have started with the middle hole, then I would either had to adjust up or down one hole rather than having to potentially test all three positions. Here is what they looked like when the bows were too low.





I hated to do it, but I pulled the headliner back down and put all of the bows into the middle positions and that was the ticket. That tension was gone in the center of each of the bows and it was even all the way across the top. Glad to be done with that. Next it was time to glue down the headliner and do one final stretch. I wasn't happy that I was unable to get the wrinkles out of the the material between 3rd and 4th bow. No it was pulled nicely to the rear of the car, but when I tried to pull it from the side, it made a bunch of other places start wrinkling so this was the best I could do. I'm hoping that I can use a heat gun or iron carefully to reduce or eliminate some of it. Overall pretty pleased with the final product.









I didn't take a picture, but I took 1/4" staples to the tack strip then trimmed off the excess and installed the sail panels. I was also able to re-install the original trim wind lace panels on the front and rear which makes for a very original looking install. In the middle of that install, I was also working on polishing up the trim and reinstalling it on the rear interior panels. They turned out better than I expected. It worked so well that I'll be doing the same thing to the door panels, A pillar trim and other misc. parts I have.

Before:



After:





Here's the passenger side.





Once I test fit the windlace with the rear interior panels, I found that I needed to move them both down slightly to eliminate the gaps. Now that the headliner and sail panels are installed, glued down and the windlace in the correct placement it was time to re-install the weatherstripping gutters. But before I could do that, I needed to polish them and clean up all of the grime and overspray over the years.

Before:







That's all for now. Hoping to finish up a few wires, and button up the remaining interior pieces that need to be re-installed. It's going to be very different this year driving the car with a completed interior.

Thanks,
Ryan

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

FormTA

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #845 on: April 13, 2020, 01:11:01 PM »
Car is looking great!
79 Trans am 301 (work in progress) LS swap n progress
79 Formula 301 (Work in progress)
67 RS Camaro (Work in progress)
See the recurring theme???

Names, Luke. If I hear anyone telling me they're my father....

Nexus

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #846 on: April 15, 2020, 06:43:21 AM »
Very Nice  (in your best Borat voice)
Charlie

79 Esprit but like many, it will be a T/A clone
(19 years and counting but still have her)

roadking77

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #847 on: April 15, 2020, 06:48:50 AM »
Looking really good Ryan, great job on the headliner. I put a new convertible top on a Mercedes I owned. First time doing such a job, and boy was it a job. I ended up with a slight wrinkle at each side behind the door windows, what would be the b pillar. I tried pulling every which way and it would not go away until I finally decided it was good enough.  Then I started looking at others and they all had the same thing.
Finished!
77 T/A - I will Call this one DONE!
79 TATA 4sp-Next Project?
79 TATA - Lost to Fire!
86 Grand Prix - Sold
85 T/A - Sold
85 Fiero - Sold
82 Firebird - Sold
'38-CZ 250
'39-BSA Gold Star
'49-Triumph 350
'52-Ariel Red Hunter
'66-BSA Lightning
'01-HD RoadKing

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #848 on: April 15, 2020, 11:07:58 AM »
Thanks guys. It's been nice working from home because I can take a break and work on my car for 15 mins a couple times a day.  8-)

I bought the RS chin spoiler kit for my car almost a year ago, but I was driving it so much last year that I didn't take the time to get it installed. I've been doing so much interior stuff lately, I wanted to take a break and do something different. I figured, while it was up on the wheel stands it would be a good opportunity to install it. It only took about an hour, but it made a huge difference in the front. I'm really glad I finally installed it.





While I was under the front, I decided to see if I could make the turning signal fit a little nicer. I never test fit the signals before I painted and installed it on the car, and come to find out the bracket wasn't welded in the right location. Not perfect, but definitely much less noticeable. Maybe when I do a cam swap, I'll pull off the front end and address it then. Also, it doesn't mean anything, but the turning signal housings are from a real Tripoli Turquoise 1968 Camaro Z/28 RS car. I picked them up at a swap meet several years ago. I love using original pieces when I can.

Here's the marker light held in the correct position and how misaligned the bolt hole are.



Before:



After:



Then I moved onto installing the door weather seals. They didn't take long at all, but what did was aligning the door and quarter glass. All I can say to anyone doing it themselves is take your time and make small adjustments. Not sure if this is the correct way, but I started with the rear quarter glass. I made sure that it fit really well into the weather seal, and then moved onto the door glass. That got me really close, but I ended up needing to bounce back and forth tweaking them so that all the seals fit together properly. It's not perfect, but is as good if not better than how it would have been from the factory.



It's hard to tell, but here is one picture I got when I was fitting the rear quarter glass. Without the seals on it seemed to fit great, but after, it was clear that it was contacting the "gutter". With the window rolled up, the glass was directly contacting the polished lip. There are set screws that needed to be pulled inward and then re-tightened. Afterwards, it fit very nicely in the weather seal pocket.



Hard to see, but the line on the weatherseal where its light black to dark black is the edge of the glass.



Cheers,
Ryan


1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

Nexus

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #849 on: April 15, 2020, 02:08:36 PM »
I like those chin spoilers on these cars

Alligning the side glass is so tedious that is one job I'm not looking forward too.
Charlie

79 Esprit but like many, it will be a T/A clone
(19 years and counting but still have her)

Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #849 on: April 15, 2020, 02:08:36 PM »

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #850 on: April 16, 2020, 06:03:19 AM »
Thanks Nexus, I agree the chin spoilers make a big difference.

Good thing about second gens though is you only have one window to worry about. I have two per side and they all have to play nicely together.

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

76455sd

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #851 on: April 16, 2020, 07:19:54 AM »
Car looks great.  I love how you say you get to work on your car for ‘fifteen minutes”. Each of those tasks would take me 15 hours and it wouldn’t look as nice as your work.   :grin:
Steve D
'76 LE 455/4speed/solid roof - SOLD
'02 WS6 T/A convertible

jonathonar89

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #852 on: April 16, 2020, 10:23:44 AM »
Little improvements like that go a long way for presentation.

Keep on going!

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #853 on: April 21, 2020, 08:21:53 AM »
In keeping with the Penny Pincher theme, here's a DIY project that I completed to save a few bucks. The hardware for the rear speakers needed to be installed before the package tray could be installed, but I didn't want to buy new speakers right now since it's really not a top priority. So rather than get new speakers, I decided to use some old speakers I had, but the problem is they are round 6.5" and the package tray accepts 6x9 speakers. So my solution was to make an adapter that mounts to the existing hardware, but is set up for a 6.5" round speaker. I broke out some old speaker covers I had and made a trusty cardboard template.



Then transferred it to some 3/4" board I had laying around.



Once I got them cut out, I realized that the hard edge would likely make for some weird sound from the speakers. I used a router to soften the edge and smooth out the transition. And I also realized that when I used my compass, I measured out 2.25" rather than 2.75", so my circle was an inch short. So I had to go back and cut the wholes out larger then bevel the edges.





Here you can see the speaker installed and how you can't add hardware once the package tray cover is installed. The metal covering the speakers isn't ideal, but I have a tough time cutting up the package tray considering it's lasted 51 years already... I can live with a little distortion as it gives a little of that retro feeling.





I then moved onto the original mono single speaker from the front dash. The speaker was falling apart, but I thought this would make for a great platform to mount a pair of 3.5" speakers. I created a template and cut out the parts to make the speakers fit. I still need to finish the edges, but this will work nicely.







I pulled this stereo out of my old Silverado before I sold it, and thought I would see how it fits down low. It surprisingly fits really well and I'm going to make a bracket to mount it right here. I'm not sure if this will be a permanent thing, but for now it's doesn't cost me anything but time.





My interior is really coming together. I have a few more finishing touches to do and then I can button it up for good. I still need to mock up the rear seats again and I can measure for some car seat anchors. Last year I used the stock seat belts and it worked "Ok", but I'm going to do something stronger. I'm going to make some plates that anchor into the seat belt mounts that will allow me to hook into the car seat latches.



Cheers,
Ryan

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

sensei451

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #854 on: April 21, 2020, 04:33:02 PM »
I used some retro company that makes the double speaker setup for the front. It wasn't that great, the plate they use was too flimsy. Your penny-solution is better.

Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #854 on: April 21, 2020, 04:33:02 PM »


2020-B1-8


ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #855 on: April 27, 2020, 09:54:58 AM »
I've been plugging away this last week doing some work here and there. I finished fitting up my speakers to the old mono speaker, got the holes drilled and then painted the whole thing. I think it turned out great and only cost me the time to modify it. Turns out the front speakers I have are crackling, so I'll have to get some replacements. They won't get better right?? The rears are perfect, so I may just leave these out for now and worry about it later or I may just pick up a cheap set of 3.5" speakers on eBay.





As I've been working away at getting my interior buttoned up, I turned my attention to the sun visors. My originals were in really good shape, with the exception of the trim that goes along the outside. So I put on my upholstery hat, needle, thread and went to work. I didn't spend too much time on it, but was able to get the trim lined up right and was able to put the needle through most of the original stitching holes.

What I started with.



After a little elbow grease.





Installed. It helped out tremendously installing the screws in the sunvisor holes before I installed the headliner. took just a minute to find them and cut the holes.



Some parts came in and I was able to swap over the female to male terminals for the metripack connector. I struggled when I first went to install the reverse light plug on my car and come to find out they installed the wrong terminals in the connector. I bought a pack of new ones and the metripack removal tool. That little tool was invaluable and worked like a charm. Definitely worth the wait.





It's been so rainy here in NY, that I haven't been able to dye the last parts for my interior. I saw the forecast and Saturday looked to be dry and 60, so that was my chance to get the doors panels dyed. I first had to strip the door panels down just like I did the rear panels. Those glued lower trim panels from the door panel didn't want to come off. I pried and pried, then started to tear the actual vinyl on the panel which lead to some cussing. Then I came up with a better idea and grabbed about 12" of welding wire and made a couple 90* bends with enough room in the middle for the trim. I used that along with a heat gun and it cut through with steady pressure and worked like a charm.





This is the first one where I started pulling from the left side. Once the tool got through the part that I tore, it worked so smoothly. You can see where I stopped prying up by hand and then using the tool.



The other side worked perfectly and too so much less time.



I then stripped both panels down bare and proceeded to clean them up for paint. My process was two rounds of cleaning with window cleaner and a soft bristled brush, followed by PrepsAll paint prep cleaner and then a liberal coating of lacquer thinner. An old body guy told that the lacquer thinner softens the vinyl and works as good or better than the adhesion promoter. I have to say I'm impressed with the SEM products as it stands up very well to general use. I've tried scratching it with my nail and lightly with a screwdriver on the back side and it didn't flake or chip one bit. Nice a flexible just like I would expect. Time will tell how long it stands up though.





The finish looks a little blotchy, but it was still a little wet in this picture.



After I hand polished all of the trim it was time reinstall the window felts, middle trim and to glue back on the lower trim pieces. I used the same contact cement from my headliner install and it worked great. I left the original trim glue in place on both the trim and door panel. When the contact cement was applied, it re-activated the glue and worked beautifully to reinstall back on the panels. I used a few hammers to apply light pressure to the trim as it dried overnight.



I couldn't help myself and the next morning put the clips back on the panel and installed it. This is the first time I've had the door panels this complete and the right color in the car. I'm actually surprised at how well the panels turned out as they exceeded my expectations. I cleaned/polished/installed the arm rest I picked up at a swap meet last year as well as installed some brand new stainless interior trim screws. It's really starting to come together now.



Hoping to button up the interior very shortly.

Cheers,
Ryan

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

b_hill_86

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #856 on: April 27, 2020, 01:26:50 PM »
Lookin good! Nice job with the sun visors. I pitched some camel ones a few years ago that were all coming apart. I didn’t think I could save them but maybe I could’ve.
-Brian-

1977 Trans Am 400 4 speed

TATurbo

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #857 on: April 27, 2020, 08:55:52 PM »
Interior's looking great! I wish I had the tip for leaving the sun-visor screws in when before putting the headliner in.. That def would've saved some time and nerves cutting in that area blind when we did mine a few weeks back.  The visors themselves look like new from here. Nice job.   Mine were just like yours..In fine shape except for the trim around the edge.    I had to get Julie to sew mine though...I wouldn't even attempt it with my eyesight and fine motor skills (or lack thereof!). So Kudos!
The weather's been crappy here too.  I can't wait for things dry out!  We have a couple interior pieces we need to re-dye because I nicked them up during the install. 
Anyway...the interior's looking really good.  I hope to get to see it in person sometime this season.
Tom
King of Prussia, PA

1981 Turbo Trans-Am
Build thread - http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=69897.0

737driver

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #858 on: April 30, 2020, 09:13:17 AM »
Really nice work! I really like how you make it all look new using older pieces. Its great to see how technique and time can make parts look better than new in most cases.
Jim
1979 Trans Am- Heritage Brown -W72 (Pontiac 400) -4Speed-WS6
1972 LeMans Convertible
1977 Trans Am
1972 Firebird
1971 Firebird
1970 Firebird
1977 MGB  Roadster Convertible

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #859 on: May 07, 2020, 08:30:17 AM »
I've been busy over the last week, slowly cleaning and reinstalling parts. One item I've been meaning to address was that my rear tires kept rubbing no matter what I did for a spacer. So as I was taking measurements from the hub to the inner/outer wheel houses I was getting the same measurements. I hadn't noticed until recently though that the quarter panel/outer wheel lip was about 1/4" wider on the driver's side. That means that it's been my driver's side that was rubbing this whole time, but also meant that I needed to trim off this excess... Out comes the jig saw. I used a jig saw rather than a cut off wheel because of heat. In my thought process, it was the better of two evils. It worked well, but I did stuff a little paint off. Nothing that a touch up brush can't fix though.



I ordered what I hope to be one of the last $100 batch of parts for the car. Rear package tray corner trim, new dome light bezel, door jamb vents, door panel emblems and new door lock knobs. I also have the plastic piece that goes under the pedals that needs to be cleaned up and re-installed.



I was so excited to finish up the restoration of the door panels with the new emblems. Not bad for some old original parts and a little elbow grease.





Finally, I was able to button up all of the wiring and give the car a good thorough cleaning.





Now that it's all buttoned up, it was finally time to get her out for a test drive with the new Terminator X ECU. Earlier in the week, I went through the setup wizards that the system provides giving basic info like cubic inches, cam profile (stock, mild or aggressive), and a few other questions. Once it built the tune for me, I downloaded it to my laptop and made a few changes that cannot be done with the handheld 3.5" touch screen. Sunday came around and I figured it was time to see if all the hard work paid off. Turned the key and it came to life! It was very rich, but it was a fresh tune and doesn't start the learning process until 160*, so I assumed it was part of the process. It idled and ran ok, (~10-11 AFR) so I figured it was time to take it around the block. It was sorta bucking and popping which again, not warm enough to learn, but made it to the end of the main road, pushed the clutch in and it stalled on me. Cranked, and cranked, but wouldn't start. Hmmm... gave it a little throttle and it fired right up so I got on it a little and we were up and running. As I'm rowing through the gears, it really came to life at about half throttle and just ripped up to about 5k! Now that's what I remembered! I was going to take a big loop, so I went a little farther down the road to turn on a side road, pressed in the clutch and it stalled. By now it's up to temp but wasn't learning the way I was hoping and it repeated the same story, didn't want to idle and would stall, but ran great past half throttle. Brought it back home and parked it.

I reached out to a friend (Thanks Andrew!!) of mine who has a lot of experience with the Holley EFI and I sent him my tune. He came back to me within a few minutes and asked what MAP sensor I was using. I told him the stock LS1 MAP, and he came back to tell me that the ECU was looking for the internal MAP sensor, not the one on my engine. Because of that the ECU thought I was at WOT the entire time!! I know I changed that setting, but obviously didn't save correctly. Monday night was rainy, but then Tuesday afternoon my wife and I decided to go for a drive to get away from all the craziness. I loaded up the revised tune and immediately(literally the moment it started) the idle was clean, crisp and leaned way out from where it was. (~14.5-15 AFR) I was 110% happier with this experience. I'm taking almost the same route, and get to the end of the road before the main two lane and no idle issues at all. Settled in right where it was commanded to. Took off on the highway and it had all the get up and go I remembered. I slowed down 45-50 in the reduced speed area and it started popping just slightly, but it hadn't hit *160 yet so it wasn't in closed loop learn mode yet. Then go through the drive and once it hit the *160, I could tell it was learning as the AFR started to lean out and the exhaust notes were cleaned up. By the time I got a mile or two up the road it was running as good if not better than with the stock ECU. We continued on with zero issues and the car was running beautifully. I couldn't be happier with the new ECU and that was just with about 20 minutes of run time. I want to tweak the VE tables to really dial in the idle and also integrate my VSS so that I can add in more tuning options with speed in the mix.

Best of all, the wheels no longer rub in the rear!

I'll try and get some screenshots from the laptop next time I'm in the program to maybe help others with similar issues.

Cheers,
Ryan

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #859 on: May 07, 2020, 08:30:17 AM »

jonathonar89

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #860 on: May 07, 2020, 11:43:01 AM »
I'm glad you had a friend to help with the tune and sensor!  A lot of people would have trouble and never figure out something simple like this....whether it be carb or efi.

sensei451

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #861 on: May 07, 2020, 07:32:47 PM »
Congratulations.. How cool is it that tunes can be sent to others and in no time get back fixed. What made you replace a working stock ECU? Sorry if I missed that in an earlier post.

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #862 on: May 08, 2020, 08:50:23 AM »
What made you replace a working stock ECU? Sorry if I missed that in an earlier post.

Great question, I really didn't need to replace the stock ECU as it was running beautifully. I had just heard a lot about the Holley ECU's and how friendly their software is, so I thought I would give it a try. I was able to sell my stock swapped ECU and harness which funded most of the purchase price of the Holley kit, so I thought I'd give it a shot. I've been working with it a little bit here and there and have been very pleased with it so far. It has 4 completely programmable inputs and outputs that you can pretty much configure for anything. Eventually my plan is to install a turbo and this will make tuning it sooo much easier. Holley allows for an internal boost control, so I can basically just tell it how much boost I want to make and where and it will make all of those calculations for me.

One huge issue with the new ECU is it will not read the stock t56 VSS that uses a VR (variable resistance or SIN Wave) signal, but rather requires a square wave or Hall sensor signal. So it either requires a converter box, or in my case the output from my Dakota Digital VHX gauges. I'm still playing around with the settings, but from what I gather it will work.

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #863 on: May 08, 2020, 08:53:18 AM »
The other thing that is really neat is that if I was to swap engines down the road to say a gen4 LS motor that uses a 58x/4x crank/cam sensor signals, all I need to do is change it in my tune and it will run. If I was sticking with factory stuff, I'd either need to swap reluctor wheels or get a whole new ECU. Overall the system is more intuitive and flexible than factory ECU's.

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

TATurbo

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #864 on: May 08, 2020, 09:57:56 PM »
Congrats on the progress.  Glad to hear the Holley ECU got dialed in so quickly!
Sounds like fun. I can't wait to meet the car in person.
Tom
King of Prussia, PA

1981 Turbo Trans-Am
Build thread - http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=69897.0

FormTA

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #865 on: May 09, 2020, 04:28:05 AM »
That is awesome! Door panels look great! Does the stock ecu do any learning? Looks like you are almost 100% done with the car (at least from here). That steering wheel looks huge, I forgot how big they were.
79 Trans am 301 (work in progress) LS swap n progress
79 Formula 301 (Work in progress)
67 RS Camaro (Work in progress)
See the recurring theme???

Names, Luke. If I hear anyone telling me they're my father....

MNBob

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #866 on: May 11, 2020, 01:48:44 PM »
I agree, the interior came out nice with the black.
1979 TATA Extreme TKO .64
Hedman elite; Pypes 2.5; Borla XS; MSD 6A; Edelbrock intake; open scoop; modified Q-jet; Powermaster 150; 4 core radiator/Mark VIII fan; RobbMc mini starter; subframe connectors; solid body mounts; fiberglass rear springs; poly sway bar and link bushings; 81 master; D52’s; Blazer disks; 225/60 & 235/60 17's TrueContact's; relays for PW, PDL, lights; keyless entry

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #867 on: May 11, 2020, 02:04:09 PM »
Congrats on the progress.  Glad to hear the Holley ECU got dialed in so quickly!
Sounds like fun. I can't wait to meet the car in person.

Thanks Tom, Hopefully we can get together sometime this summer. It would be a great excuse to get the car out for a drive and see if we can figure out your tune.

That is awesome! Door panels look great! Does the stock ecu do any learning? Looks like you are almost 100% done with the car (at least from here). That steering wheel looks huge, I forgot how big they were.

Thanks Luke, I appreciate it. I'm waiting for some LATCH hooks for the boys car seats, but once they are installed I can reinstall the rear seat and cruise. Physically it's about 99.9% done, but I need to do some tweaking to the tune and the inputs and outputs. I need to get the VSS input figured out on the ECU so that I can use that for my reverse lockout, and later on I'll use it for boost by gear.  :lol:

And yes, the stock ECU's have the ability to learn and do a great job of it. That is what is referred to as the Long Term Fuel Trims (LTFT) and the Short Term Fuel Trims (STFT). When you start fresh the STFT will immediately start adding/subtracting fuel in that table based on the input from the O2 sensor. If there are enough hits in that table, eventually they move to the LTFT table. So what people do when tuning a stock vehicle without a wideband o2, is use the data that is in the LTFT table and apply that to the main fueling table VE (volumetric efficiency). That process is even more time consuming than it sounds haha.

The beauty of the Holley ECU with the integrated wideband is that it can make those calculations in minutes. When you download that file from your ECU and open it on the laptop there is a handy feature to copy that +/- data into the main VE table. I've already done that a few times on my car and it runs just as good as with the stock ECU.

The main reason that I made the switch to Holley was because of the changes that I plan to do in the future. Tuning for boost will still be complicated, but with Holley it will make the whole process much faster.

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

FormTA

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #868 on: May 11, 2020, 07:12:11 PM »
Thanks for the explanation.  When I started my car recently it still seems to have a bog so I was wondering if it will learn once I start driving it. It hasn't really even got to operating temp yet. Maybe you. Tom and I could all meet up for tuning day in the future.  :-D
79 Trans am 301 (work in progress) LS swap n progress
79 Formula 301 (Work in progress)
67 RS Camaro (Work in progress)
See the recurring theme???

Names, Luke. If I hear anyone telling me they're my father....

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #869 on: May 29, 2020, 12:33:52 PM »
Thought I'd post up some pictures of the car out in the wild. I took the car on a cruise to Watkins Glen, which is a really neat town that's about 45 mins from me. Most probably know it from the international racetrack, but it's also a really neat town. My wife and I took the day off from all of the craziness that's been happening the last few months and just went for a cruise. We stopped and got some icecream so I grabbed a photo and I also stopped at a Harley store that was on the way to snap some better pictures of the car.











I need to find a much better place to take a picture and washing it would help too haha.

Cheers,
Ryan

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #869 on: May 29, 2020, 12:33:52 PM »

jonathonar89

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #870 on: May 29, 2020, 09:57:52 PM »
I’m jealous!

Glad you were able to get it out.  Hopefully track time soon enough.  More importantly, enjoy the car, keep it driving and keep on with progress!

LeighP

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #871 on: May 30, 2020, 12:58:42 AM »
Very impressive, coming together very well.  :cool:
Regards,
Leigh

Sydney, Australia
1968 Pontiac Firebird 428 5 speed coupe

Former Firebirds -
1969 Pontiac Firebird 400
1971 Pontiac Firebird 455
1977 Pontiac Trans Am
1976 Pontiac Trans Am
1967 Pontiac Firebird 400 convertible
1967 Pontiac Firebird 400 coupe


MNBob

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #872 on: June 01, 2020, 06:55:13 AM »
Looks great.  The front air dam and the hidden headlights and grill go well together.  I also like that rear spoiler and the paint looks really good.
1979 TATA Extreme TKO .64
Hedman elite; Pypes 2.5; Borla XS; MSD 6A; Edelbrock intake; open scoop; modified Q-jet; Powermaster 150; 4 core radiator/Mark VIII fan; RobbMc mini starter; subframe connectors; solid body mounts; fiberglass rear springs; poly sway bar and link bushings; 81 master; D52’s; Blazer disks; 225/60 & 235/60 17's TrueContact's; relays for PW, PDL, lights; keyless entry

ryeguy2006a

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #873 on: June 02, 2020, 11:16:16 AM »
Thanks guys, I appreciate it.

1976 Trans Am LS1, 6 speed, C5 Brakes, LS1 rear 12" brakes, and much more...SOLD
My Build: http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=24465.0

New project: 1968 Camaro LS6, T56, Speedtech, Hotchkis, DSE, Z51 13.4" front brakes, LS1 rear disks, etc.
http://transamcountry.com/community/index.php?topic=74591.0

RamblerRacer

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Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #874 on: June 02, 2020, 11:54:39 AM »
Nice ride.

Re: 1968 Camaro Resto-mod 6.0/6 speed; Project Penny Pincher
« Reply #874 on: June 02, 2020, 11:54:39 AM »
You can help support TAC!

 



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