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Author Topic: Graveyard of Old Cars  (Read 2836 times)
thafezz
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« on: November 11, 2009, 07:01:52 AM »

A buddy of mine sent this to me and I thought I would share:

http://s760.photobucket.com/albums/xx250/chieftain52/Junkyard/?albumview=slideshow
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"once in awhile you get shown the light... in the strangest places if you look at it right..."  Scarlet Begonia's  - The Grateful Dead
Damon23
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« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2009, 07:18:57 AM »

Looks like old car city up in white georgia.
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Vannone
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2009, 11:22:37 AM »

Damon23, if you know the old car city, you probably know Wes man's restaurant across the road.  Where do you stay?
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Remember-The family that T/A's together,sTAys together
Damon23
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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2009, 12:12:11 PM »

I live in Douglasville, GA. I've been up to that place a half dozen times or so. It is kind of cool and kind of sad but now that his son is running it you can actually deal with a reasonalbe person to get parts and cars. His prices are not all that bad.
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Nick623
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2009, 01:47:14 PM »

I've always wondered how one gets so many cars? Who would spend the money to park it and let it rot. The only thing I can come up with is that it was a thriving junkyard in the 50's and the 60's before it closed and was forgotten about?
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Damon23
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2009, 06:12:27 PM »

If you think about it cars back then were cheap and when they died they were more of a nusense more than anything. They'd drop them off at the junkyard and go get a new one and not look back. The masses back then did'nt think about what the cars would be worth 20-30-40 years from now. It would be like someone giving you a bunch of sunbirds, cobalts, maybe a beat up third or fourth gen and you sitting on them for 20+ years. Throw away cars back then are gold today.
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johnsma22
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« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2009, 06:32:41 PM »

I've seen pics of that yard before. It always makes me feel a little sad and sick to my stomach.
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John

Brett79
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« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2009, 06:56:15 PM »

Those were once someone's shiny new car that they couldn't wait to show off to their friends.  Sad to see where they are now.  I guess it's better than being crushed, but not by much.
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77bandit428
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« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2009, 07:05:43 PM »

Looks like old car city up in white georgia.

Hey Damon,i was going to say the same thing BUT i didn't know his son was running the show now.The old man was WAY to high on cars 15 years ago.Is that '65 Tiger Gold Bonneville still up there with the 8 lug rims?

Russ
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firebirdparts
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firebirdparts
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2009, 09:49:54 PM »

I've always wondered how one gets so many cars? Who would spend the money to park it and let it rot. The only thing I can come up with is that it was a thriving junkyard in the 50's and the 60's before it closed and was forgotten about?

Many times, you can find junkyards that were never thriving, full of very old cars.  Some guys bought old cars, filled up what looked like a junkyard, and never sold anything off them, because they just didn't want to. Some guys just are eccentric that way. 

What usually happens is the old guy dies, and the crusher is in there a week later, and they crush GTO's, 57 Chevrolets, whatever is in there, as fast as they can go.
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Joe Bays
Rick
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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2009, 10:03:59 PM »

Back in the day, a junkyard wasn't hard to start up.  All you needed was some pasture land out somewhere that didn't have neighbors that complained.  You could get old cars for not too much and make enough stripping the easy stuff off them to meet expenses and a modest return for the operator.  Steel wasn't high-priced enough to make clearing out the hulks a priority if you had room to expand.  My dad actually looked into starting one on the family farm plot back in the mid-50s.  His business plan was thwarted by my mother, who refused to be known as the lady who lived at the junkyard.  (Another cool possiblity of my youth dashed.... Rolling Eyes)

Then local governments started regulating things.  When the Federal government got involved through the EPA things started getting tougher.  The requirements to avoid soil and runoff water contamination are pretty strigent these days, and the cost of remediating soil and ground water contamination is prohibitive.  Scrap steel prices have skyrocketed also.  That's why they don't have junkyards anymore -- they are all "automotive recycling centers".  The parts are stripped off ASAP for resale, and then the remainder is disposed of forthwith.  There are still pick-a-part operations but around here those are being closed down as quickly as local governments can force them out of business.  I know of one place that's been in the cross-hairs of city government for over 10 years now and has been taken to court by the municipality multiple times.  Sooner or later they'll fold too.
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Damon23
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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2009, 07:21:41 AM »

Looks like old car city up in white georgia.

Hey Damon,i was going to say the same thing BUT i didn't know his son was running the show now.The old man was WAY to high on cars 15 years ago.Is that '65 Tiger Gold Bonneville still up there with the 8 lug rims?

Russ

Hey Russ. It is actually a 65 Grand Prix and yes it is still there. It is to far gone now to do anything with but he still has it along with a 64 Grand Prix that I tried to buy several years ago. He said he was ready to move it. It is complete and is supposed to run. I think it is $2500.
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Vannone
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« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2009, 07:58:48 AM »

I tried to deal with that guy a long time ago, and yea he was way too high.  Haven't dealt with the son.  Really haven't been in there in a long time, but we use a cow /pig/deer processor up there that my sun in law found.  They live in Bartow Co.  He has quite a collection.  Kinda does make one sick to see it all just sit there and rot.  I can't abide car abuse.
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Remember-The family that T/A's together,sTAys together
shakerz
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« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2009, 12:00:05 PM »

If you think about it cars back then were cheap and when they died they were more of a nusense more than anything. They'd drop them off at the junkyard and go get a new one and not look back. The masses back then did'nt think about what the cars would be worth 20-30-40 years from now. It would be like someone giving you a bunch of sunbirds, cobalts, maybe a beat up third or fourth gen and you sitting on them for 20+ years. Throw away cars back then are gold today.

Just think of the 5 digit odometer until the late 80's. Cars weren't built or expected to last more then ten years. Now cars run well into the 300k's on mileage. Model T's would have the motors, tranny's and rearends pulled after 40 or 50k and rebuilt. We've come a long way, but I'm thankful for guys like this father and son. Just wish they could all be in west Texas with me so to be preserved from moisture rot better.
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DeCaff2007
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Radix Malorum Est Cupiditas.


« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2009, 02:47:13 PM »

There are still pick-a-part operations but around here those are being closed down as quickly as local governments can force them out of business.  I know of one place that's been in the cross-hairs of city government for over 10 years now and has been taken to court by the municipality multiple times.  Sooner or later they'll fold too.

You wouldn't be talking about Harry's U-Pull It in northeast PA, would you?
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Rick
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2009, 06:47:50 PM »

No, the one in particular I'm thinking about is on the west side of Indianapolis, IN.  There have actually been a couple of agreements for it to move, but those were nullified when people living adjacent to the proposed destination sued to keep it out.
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70-4spdTA
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« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2009, 09:50:50 PM »

If you think about it cars back then were cheap and when they died they were more of a nusense more than anything. They'd drop them off at the junkyard and go get a new one and not look back. The masses back then did'nt think about what the cars would be worth 20-30-40 years from now. It would be like someone giving you a bunch of sunbirds, cobalts, maybe a beat up third or fourth gen and you sitting on them for 20+ years. Throw away cars back then are gold today.

Todays throw away cars will be nothing more than plastic garbage 20-30-40 years from now. It will be almost totally impossible to restore todays cars 30-40 years from now.... besides who would want a piece of warped plastic?
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