Author Topic: Steering Column Disassembly  (Read 89927 times)

pancho400cid

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #80 on: January 05, 2016, 07:47:24 PM »
I checked this post and was disappointed to see the pix gone.  Thanks for the newer link!

Memo to self - take screen shots before the new one goes away....
1978 Trans Am - Chesterfield Brown - current project
1978 Trans Am - Silver - future uncertain

Transamdad

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #81 on: January 06, 2016, 04:37:05 PM »
I disassembled my column, does the lower housing come off?

Does this shifter connector come off?


 Heres the broken lower housing compared to unbroken rusted up POS I want to take parts from
 It seems they are pressed together, any help or ideas are appreciated
« Last Edit: January 06, 2016, 04:47:01 PM by Transamdad »

Transamdad

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #82 on: July 01, 2016, 06:22:49 AM »
I disassembled my column, does the lower housing come off?

Does this shifter connector come off?


 Heres the broken lower housing compared to unbroken rusted up POS I want to take parts from
 It seems they are pressed together, any help or ideas are appreciated
BUMP

Transamdad

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #83 on: July 01, 2016, 06:25:52 AM »
The "D" type steering shaft, does it only connect one way, it doesn't look like a true "D" more of a squared oval/circle , will it go together either way? One way or 180 degrees turn and go the other way also?
Thanks for any help.

Spoon

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #84 on: August 06, 2016, 05:04:09 AM »
Sorry that you didn't get a response here. Were you able to figure it out?

Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #84 on: August 06, 2016, 05:04:09 AM »

Spoon

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #85 on: August 22, 2016, 04:19:36 AM »
I only had 1 key for my ignition, and my turn signal switch was stiff, so I decided to go after those two items recently. I thought it might be better if I just added on to this thread instead of starting something new, hope that is OK. I only went as far as the ignition cylinder, but my setup was slightly different than the original example.

My car is a 1979 10th Anniv. Auto Trans:


Here is the back side of the steering wheel emblem:


Now you can see down into the hub, next we will be removing the c-clip from the steering shaft:


Next I used my cheap (but handy!) clip pliers from Harbor Freight to remove the c-clip:


Next remove the hex nut that holds the hub onto the steering shaft:


For me, a 13/16” socket and extender worked well:


After removing the hex nut, just pull out the horn switch/actuator. Here I have placed the horn switch, nut, and clip together so that I remember how it goes back together:


Now we are looking at the bottom of the hub. Note the serrated teeth that index the steering wheel and hub to the steering shaft. There is an index mark on both as a reference point. I would really suggest taking a picture here so that you can put them back together in exactly the same position. As you can tell, my threads (5/16”) were slightly corroded, so I used a thread chase to clean them up before I inserted the hub puller tool:


Next I attached the steering wheel or hub puller tool. You can’t really tell from the picture, but the steering wheel puller is not actually touching the face of the steering wheel. It pulls against the threads in the bottom of the hub and the steering shaft only:


After the steering wheel / hub removal. Note the loose paint on top of the plastic cover, you can brush it off with your finger:


Gently pry the edge of the plastic cover outward over the tabs to remove. There are 3 tabs in total:


With the plastic cover removed, you are looking at the locking plate:


You will use a lock plate remover to apply compression to the spring behind the locking plate, which will expose a retaining ring on the steering shaft that holds the locking plate in position:


With the locking plate under compression you will see the lock plate retaining ring:


Use your best judgement on how to remove the retaining ring, I used the ends of two screwdrivers to pry up the ends of the ring. You can then slide the ring off the steering shaft:


After removing the lock plate retaining ring, and the lock plate compressor tool, you can slide the lock plate off the steering shaft:


Next you can remove the horn switch:


And finally the spring that was behind the locking plate:


Next I removed the hazard pull switch with a phillips screwdriver. Sorry, didn’t get the “before” picture:


Next I removed the screw that connects the turn signal lever to the turn signal switch. On my car, the lever doesn’t directly attach to the switch. There is a bracket between those two parts:


With the screw removed, I rotated the bracket out of the way:


Next I went after the ignition buzzer switch (the white tab). This little guy is easy to remove, but there is a trick. The ignition key cylinder must be in the RUN position (I think?) which releases a tab in the buzzer switch:


This is the tab in the buzzer switch that is held in place by the key ignition cylinder. If the ignition cylinder is in the RUN position it will release the buzzer switch:


In this picture you can see the tab in the ignition cylinder that retains the buzzer switch:


And with the cylinder tab withdrawn. Now you can pull the buzzer switch:


Keep the key in the RUN position to remove the ignition cylinder.


Remove the phillips screw that retains the ignition cylinder:




Now the ignition cylinder slides out:


Key code?:


Looking back at the slot that mates to the ignition cylinder:


That’s as far as I needed to go to remove my lock cylinder. I thought that the local GM dealership could cut a new key based on the lock cylinder code, but they said not really. Thankfully there were a couple of old-timers at the parts desk, and they just looked at the ridges on the key and wrote down a numerical code that they programmed into the key machine to make a copy. I though that was pretty amazing, but they could look at the ridge heights on the key and tell which number it corresponded to. So I was able to keep the same cylinder for reinstallation.

The other thing that I wanted to do is work on my turn signal switch a bit. Mine was really stiff and I thought that eventually it would break. I found that the resistance in the switch is from two metal flat springs for over center and return operation I think. They are bent in the middle and are forced against tabs in the plastic switch housing when the turn signal is activated. I bent mine to a more flat shape which took some pressure off the switch and allowed for smooth operation. You can just remove and replace these springs by hand:






« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 05:05:08 PM by Spoon »

sreta

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #86 on: April 17, 2017, 07:57:47 AM »
"Transamdad", you can remove the inner tube easily. Just knock a little bit the upper metal collar with a small hammer, and it will slide off.

« Last Edit: April 17, 2017, 08:54:45 AM by sreta »

Joe

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Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #87 on: May 08, 2018, 01:54:16 PM »
Holy thread revival!

Anyways, anyone know the part numbers for both ateering wheel bearings? The ones inside the assembly.
Joe
76 T/A

Re: Steering Column Disassembly
« Reply #87 on: May 08, 2018, 01:54:16 PM »
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